This has been a pretty busy week in climate diplomacy. This month’s G-7 meeting will be one of the decisive stepping stones towards COP26, and G-7 countries will have to show ambition; that’s why the UK is aiming to secure a pledge to end subsidies for fossil fuels.

But the G-7 is not the only summit happening this month: Macron just hosted a France-Africa summit discussing financing recovery for African countries. But probably the biggest piece of news this week was the IEAs net-zero plan, in which they advocated for the end to new fossil fuel developments for the first time. Finally, on the vaccines front, a new discussion arose around the slow vaccination of underdeveloped countries, and how it could affect COP26. These are this week’s top stories in climate diplomacy:

Queue-jumping? Global vaccine shortage imperils Glasgow climate talks

Queue-jumping? Global vaccine shortage imperils UN climate talks
As poor countries focus on immunising the most vulnerable as vaccines run short, climate negotiators could miss out, health experts say

G-7 meeting will be one of the decisive stepping stones towards COP26

U.K. Aims to Secure G-7 Pledge to End Subsidies for Fossil Fuels

U.K. Aims to Secure G-7 Pledge to End Subsidies for Fossil Fuels
The Group of Seven nations are closing in on agreement this month to phase out fossil-fuel subsidies after the U.K. won backing for the proposal from Italy.

G7’S Chance– And Duty – to Show Solidarity With The Rest Of The World

End New Fossil Fuel Development,IEA Demands In Groundbreaking Net Zero Plan

No new oil, gas or coal development if world is to reach net zero by 2050, says world energy body
Governments must close gap between net zero rhetoric and reality, says International Energy Agency head

Macron hosts Africa-France Summit financing Africa’s post-pandemic recovery

France, African leaders push to redirect $100 bln in IMF SDR reserves by October
French President Emmanuel Macron said on Tuesday a summit in Paris on Africa financing had agreed to work towards persuading rich nations by October to reallocate $100 billion in IMF special drawing rights monetary reserves to African states.